Tuesday, March 28, 2017

2017 Adirondack Life Annual Photo Contest Winners



It's that time of year again when we get to see all of the beautiful photographs from the photo contest winners in the Annual Adirondack Life Photography Contest.





Congratulations to Richard Tyrseck for his stunning grand prize winning entry Misty Morning, Clear Pond.  Click the link below for details and to see all of the winners!

http://adirondacklifemag.com/photo/2017_Winners/photo2017.php

Rick is API Alumni and a wonderful photographer. He wins a spot in the Weekend with Adirondack Life workshop in Wilmington this September.  Get details about this great event hosted by three our of fabulous instructors here!

And congratulations also go out to all of the other winners!  There are always so many beautiful photographs!


Tim Goodrich (first-place landscape)
Spencer Morrissey (second-place landscape) 

Melanie Houck (first-place wildlife)
Pat McGuire (second-place wildlife) 
Sue Kiesel (third-place wildlife) API Alumni! 

Cassandra Blair (first-place people)
Robert Stone (second-place people)
Theresa Denney (third-place people)

Debbie Thacker (first-place Macro)
Ryan Nerp (second-place Macro)

Sue Bonacci (first-place B&W)
Daniel Hart (second-place B&W)
Dave Waite (third-place B&W)

Blaine Stauffer II (first place Recreation)

Editors Choice:
Emma Terry

Check out our 2017 schedule below.  You can also find us on Facebook!






Sunday, February 26, 2017

API's Winter Wonderland

The more I shoot winter the more I appreciate its many nuances of weather and light: how sunlight highlights wind-blown patterns on the snow.  How shadows turn rich blue and become graphic compositional tools.  How snow and ice react to the ever-changing temperatures.  And it's incredibly beautiful at night.  On cold winter nights, the stars seem to sizzle overhead.


To me, winter is most scenic in its extremes — big snows and heavy ice.  We were fortunate to find both.  Major snow storms, which dumped about two feet on the central Adirondacks, bookended our four-day workshop.  In a spruce and pine forest, we shot in snow up to our thighs.  On a -4 degree night we photographed the Big Dipper over Raquette Lake.  On the Moose River — which kept  flowing despite the cold — intricate ice formations clung to boulders.


This set looked like Christmas ornaments.  When converted to black & white, their intricate forms and textures jump out.


Our classroom sessions were devoted to the Art of Seeing winter, taking advantage of its many scenic and compositional opportunities.  We also covered shooting and blending multiple exposures as panoramas, HDR's, layer masks, and focus stacks — all to push the bounds of what's possible shooting the Adirondacks' incredible fourth season.  My heart-felt thanks to the participants, for their interest, passion, and creative spirit.  I very much enjoyed being with you.  Winter's not over yet and the possibilities continue to evolve as the weather changes.  Explore it while you can!